newyorker:

Emma Donoghue shares the songs, photographs, and postcards that inspired her novel “Frog Music”: http://nyr.kr/1jwFy3g

“From a ship’s passenger list I knew that Blanche’s man, Arthur, had been an acrobat, but it was an anonymous, sexy photo of ‘Jules Léotard with Trapeze’ that convinced me to make Arthur a trapeze artist. Léotard’s famous quip, before he died young, of smallpox, was that if you want the crowd to love you the trapeze is optional, but the fleshings—the costume that would later be named after him—are obligatory.”

Above: Jules Léotard in Kleidung

newyorker:

Emma Donoghue shares the songs, photographs, and postcards that inspired her novel “Frog Music”: http://nyr.kr/1jwFy3g

“From a ship’s passenger list I knew that Blanche’s man, Arthur, had been an acrobat, but it was an anonymous, sexy photo of ‘Jules Léotard with Trapeze’ that convinced me to make Arthur a trapeze artist. Léotard’s famous quip, before he died young, of smallpox, was that if you want the crowd to love you the trapeze is optional, but the fleshings—the costume that would later be named after him—are obligatory.”

Above: Jules Léotard in Kleidung

Reblogged from The New Yorker
vintageanchorbooks:

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”
― Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

vintageanchorbooks:

“Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.”

Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Sarah Barron has the room in stitches! (at Unabridged Bookstore)

Sarah Barron has the room in stitches! (at Unabridged Bookstore)

melvillehouse:

Same.

TBT GPOY

melvillehouse:

Same.

TBT GPOY

groveatlanticinc:

Love us some Mary Oliver!
explore-blog:

For National Poetry Month, Mary Oliver on the mystery of the human psyche, the secret of great poetry, and how rhythm makes us come alive.
Excerpt illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton. 

groveatlanticinc:

Love us some Mary Oliver!

explore-blog:

For National Poetry Month, Mary Oliver on the mystery of the human psyche, the secret of great poetry, and how rhythm makes us come alive.

Excerpt illustrated by Wendy MacNaughton

Reblogged from
sarabarron1000000:

See you tonight, Chicago!

sarabarron1000000:

See you tonight, Chicago!

Grasshopper Jungle | Andrew Smith

We love this book! Its great and memorable and buggy but in all of the good ways. Buy here: http://www.unabridgedbookstore.com/book/9780525426035

Reblogged from Penguin Teen
only the bright-chested bird knows the end of this song
but he is winging over water and must not waste his breath to sing
Reblogged from The Rumblr
lastnightsreading:

Jeffrey Eugenides at Columbia University, 4/9/14

lastnightsreading:

Jeffrey Eugenides at Columbia University, 4/9/14

Reblogged from Last Night's Reading
vintageanchorbooks:

The film based on Nobel Laureate Alice Munro's “Hateship Courtship Loveship Friendship Marriage” opens on Friday: http://www.ifcfilms.com/films/hateship-loveship
"Kristin Wiig’s turn as a dowdy caretaker is the highlight of this contemporary American take on Cinderella." — The Hollywood Reporter”
"Liza Johnson makes fine, steady progress with this delicate and absorbing character study starring Kristen Wiig."— Variety
  In the her tenth collection (the title story of which is the basis for the new film “Hateship Loveship”), Alice Munro achieves new heights, creating narratives that loop and swerve like memory, and conjuring up characters as thorny and contradictory as people we know ourselves. A tough-minded housekeeper jettisons the habits of a lifetime because of a teenager’s practical joke. A college student visiting her brassy, unconventional aunt stumbles on an astonishing secret and its meaning in her own life. An incorrigible philanderer responds with unexpected grace to his wife’s nursing-home romance. Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage is Munro at her best, tirelessly observant, serenely free of illusion, deeply and gloriously humane. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vBcde

vintageanchorbooks:

The film based on Nobel Laureate Alice Munro's “Hateship Courtship Loveship Friendship Marriage” opens on Friday: http://www.ifcfilms.com/films/hateship-loveship

"Kristin Wiig’s turn as a dowdy caretaker is the highlight of this contemporary American take on Cinderella." — The Hollywood Reporter

"Liza Johnson makes fine, steady progress with this delicate and absorbing character study starring Kristen Wiig."— Variety


In the her tenth collection (the title story of which is the basis for the new film “Hateship Loveship”), Alice Munro achieves new heights, creating narratives that loop and swerve like memory, and conjuring up characters as thorny and contradictory as people we know ourselves. A tough-minded housekeeper jettisons the habits of a lifetime because of a teenager’s practical joke. A college student visiting her brassy, unconventional aunt stumbles on an astonishing secret and its meaning in her own life. An incorrigible philanderer responds with unexpected grace to his wife’s nursing-home romance. Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage is Munro at her best, tirelessly observant, serenely free of illusion, deeply and gloriously humane. Read an excerpt here: http://ow.ly/vBcde
One mustn’t be so rigid or egotistical to think that every comma is sacrosanct.
Reblogged from The Paris Review
akashicbooks:

politicsprose:

!!!

WAIT STOP

Relevant to our interests.

akashicbooks:

politicsprose:

!!!

WAIT STOP

Relevant to our interests.

Reblogged from Akashic Books
vintageanchorbooks:

Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.
Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.
More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html

vintageanchorbooks:

Debut novelists Eimear McBride, Audrey Magee and Hannah Kent join Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Donna Tartt and Jhumpa Lahiri on the shortlist for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction.

Announcing the list this evening (7th April) at the Serpentine Sackler gallery in central London, chair of judges Helen Fraser said each of this year’s shortlisted books was “original and extraordinary in its own way” and offered “something different and exciting and illuminating”.

More here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/tartt-lahiri-adichie-baileys-womens-shortlist.html